The Diabetes Health Crisis

Posted by Heather Doggett on 24 May 2019

Around 200,000 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year and 12.3 million people in the UK are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This is predicted to become a huge crisis for the future health of the UK’s population.  It is a serious health condition that can have a major impact on one’s life and once at an advanced stage, diabetes can cause a host of other health complications.  With type 2 diabetes your body still breaks down carbohydrate from food and drink and turns it into glucose (sugar).  The body will either resist the effects of insulin or it doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain normal glucose levels – Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy,...

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Body Image

Posted by Heather Doggett on 10 May 2019

Mental Health Awareness Week takes place 13-19 May 2019.  The theme this year is Body Image – how we think and feel about our bodies.  Body image is: “…the perception that a person has of their physical self and the thoughts and feelings that result from that perception” Body image and how we feel about how we look is anything but trivial.  Body image is a complex phenomenon and affects us all on so many different levels.  Building a positive body image is a good way to counteract the negative stream of images through television, our telephones, and the social media platforms that we are encouraged to compare ourselves to. Activities to improve body image:- Appreciate all that your body can doKeep a top-ten list of things you like about yourselfRemind...

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“Give a girl the right shoes and she can conquer the world’” – Marilyn Monroe

Posted by Heather Doggett on 26 April 2019

The only ‘right’ shoes this month are a pair of well-fitting walking shoes that provide both cushioning and arch support because May is National Walking Month.  As the owner of Daisy, the slightly chubby black Labrador, I do get to walk daily and on average I probably walk 3 miles per day – but really, how good is walking? It is recommended that adults achieve at least 150 minutes of physical activity (of moderate intensity) per week – currently 26% of UK adults have less that 30 minutes of physical activity per week.  Walking is simple and free.  It is a low-impact form of exercise that provides a productive workout when performed at a pace of 3 to 4 mph – a brisk pace rather than a stroll.  You should be able to talk, but not sing the words to a song. ...

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APRIL IS STRESS AWARENESS MONTH

Posted by Heather Doggett on 26 April 2019

Stress is primarily a physical response. When stressed, the body thinks it is under attack and switches to ‘fight or flight’ mode, releasing a complex mix of hormones and chemicals to prepare the body for physical action.  Being under pressure is a normal part of life and is not necessarily a bad thing.  It can help you take action, feel more energised and get results. But if you often become overwhelmed by stress, these feelings could start to be a problem.  There might be one big thing causing you stress, but stress can also be caused by a build-up of small pressures. People experience stress in different ways and this contributes to stress manifesting itself differently.  To minimise risk is to identify stress-related problems as early as possible, so that action...

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APRIL IS STRESS AWARENESS MONTH

Posted by Heather Doggett on 03 April 2019

Stress is primarily a physical response. When stressed, the body thinks it is under attack and switches to ‘fight or flight’ mode, releasing a complex mix of hormones and chemicals to prepare the body for physical action.  Being under pressure is a normal part of life and is not necessarily a bad thing.  It can help you take action, feel more energised and get results. But if you often become overwhelmed by stress, these feelings could start to be a problem.  There might be one big thing causing you stress, but stress can also be caused by a build-up of small pressures. People experience stress in different ways and this contributes to stress manifesting itself differently.  To minimise risk is to identify stress-related problems as early as possible, so that action...

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TESTICULAR CANCER – CHECK YOUR NUTS!

Posted by Heather Doggett on 19 March 2019

April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month Testicular cancer occurs when normal, healthy cells, which are carefully regulated in the body, begin to reproduce uncontrollably in the testicles. It usually occurs in one testicle but can occur in both. 2,400  men are diagnosed with testicular cancer every year in the UK – that’s more than 6 per day Testicular cancer is 98% curable if detected early – meaning men surviving 10 years or more Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged 15-45 with the highest incidence in men aged 30-34 Testicular cancer is on the rise– incidence rates have increased by more than a quarter since the early 1990s Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer A risk factor is anything that changes your chance of getting a disease such as cancer. Different...

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3RD MARCH 2019 IS WORLD HEARING DAY

Posted by Heather Doggett on 15 February 2019

2 ears or not to hear…… There are 11 million people with hearing loss across the UK, that’s around one in six of us, rising to 15.6 million by 2035 An estimated 900,000 people in the UK have severe or profound hearing loss More than 40% of people over 50 years old have hearing loss, rising to 71% of people over the age of 70 Around one in 10 UK adults has tinnitus How is hearing damaged? Inside the cochlea (our hearing organ that sits deep inside our ears), there are thousands of sound-sensing hair cells. These cells pick up sound waves and turn them into electrical signals that are sent to the brain and interpreted as sound. Experts agree that hair cells can start to become damaged by noise at 85dB and above.  When you’re exposed to too much loud noise, the hair cells become...

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FEBRUARY IS REYNAUD’S AWARENESS MONTH

Posted by Heather Doggett on 30 January 2019

February is Raynauds Awareness Month Raynaud’s  (Ray-nose) is a phenomenon that affects the circulation – the small blood vessels in hands and feet, fingers or toes are over-sensitive to even the slightest changes in temperature, the cold and sometimes stress.  A Raynaud’s attack is where the fingers sometimes change colour, but not always, from white, to blue, to red. Raynaud’s phenomenon is a common condition thought to affect up to ten million people in the UK.  It can be sub-divided into primary and secondary.  This phenomenon was first described by Maurice Raynaud, a French Doctor in 1862. Anyone of any age can develop primary Raynaud’s which occurs spontaneously without an underlying condition being present.  It can also be hereditary.  Secondary Raynaud’s,...

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THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS

Posted by Heather Doggett on 17 December 2018

On the First day of Christmas: Here is some sound advice to get through this month of gifts, goodwill, shopping, excessive food and alcohol consumption, stress and indigestion…. On the 2nd day of Christmas: Take a deep breath …and prepare for the onslaught! As the busiest and arguably most stressful month of the year begins, it pays to have some coping strategies in place. To restore calm, relax all the muscles in your body and consciously slow your breathing rate by half. Close your eyes and inhale through your nose, filling your belly with air. Hold for five seconds, then exhale slowly through your mouth. Repeated 20 times, this will bring your pulse rate down and fight stress. On the 3rd day of Christmas: Feed up your immunity To get through the Christmas festivities, bolster...

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TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS when all through the house not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse …

Posted by Heather Doggett on 30 November 2018

……..with the exception of approximately two thirds of adults throughout all developed nations who do not attain the recommended average 8 hours of sleep per night.  In fact, the decimation of sleep is having such a catastrophic impact on our health, life expectancy, safety and productivity that sleep loss is now deemed the epidemic causing the greatest public health challenge in the twenty first century in developed nations. THE IMPACT Insufficient sleep, even short periods of poor sleep, can contribute to negative health:– Profoundly disrupts blood sugar levels; increased risk of diabetes Increases the likelihood of cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure Contributes to all major psychiatric conditions including anxiety and depression Reduces male and female reproductivity It...

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